Eurobike coverage: Part Two

Mark Sutton
Eurobike coverage: Part Two

BikeBiz could have dedicated the whole October issue to the world's largest bike exhibition and still only have scratched the surface. Here is part two of four in our series of show coverage:

Reelight (Raleigh)

Set for availability toward Christmas, Reelight's new light line has upped its output on previous year's models. Three new design revisions were displayed at Eurobike, beginning with the SL500 and topping out with the RL700.

The RL700 is Reelight's new headlight, complete with a friction-free generator. The solid-beam emitted by the RL700 is base don a totally new patented generator design with a one watt output. Mounted to the front fork with quick mount power magnets on the spokes, the system works at a slightly greater distance than previously thanks to more powerful magnets.

Suited to seat post and handlebar mounting, the SL500 kit is packed with both a white front light and a rear red light, both of which can operate on flashing and steady modes. Again, no batteries are required thanks to the stronger magnets and the beam emitted is through a wide angle optic lens, thus lights the majority of the path ahead, while ensuring you're seen form behind.
Reelight was a winner of last year's Eurobike Awards.

Philips
Following successful trials in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, mainstream consumer electronics brand Philips is planning to roll out its line of bcycle lights across Europe, though said the UK won't be one of the first serviced.
Having begun in the lighting market in the 1930's, the firm has a long history in lighting, though had not announced any plans for the bicycle market ahead of the firm's presence at Eurobike.

Gathering feedback from pro cyclists and having secured OEM business, the firm's progress will interest many in the business. At present a dynamo and pedelec-specific model sit within a small, yet neat range.

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Storck
Storck's top-end race machine, the F0.6, showed off some clever new tech, which has enabled the firm to tuck brakes within the 700 gram frame's construction – something which the firm's Eurobike representative believes is an industry first.
Incredibly stiff seatstay construction also means this is one of the first frames choosing not to include a bridge. Built exclusively for the use of Shimano Di2 technology, this frame is a racer's dream, though will come with a price tag.

On the trekking side of things, Storck's Multiroad is an important model within the catalogue, coming in both male and female, low step over versions, as well as an electric specific build utilising a 250-watt, Swiss-made electric motor.

The firm recently presented Formula One racer Rubens Barrichello with a limited edition electric Storck Multiroad to mark the motorsporting legend's 300th race. The build was worked on alongside F1 team Cosworth and presented by Storck founder Markus Storck ahead of the landmark August race.

Schwalbe
With more than 50 of its staff at Eurobike and a constantly busy stand, it was safe to assume Schwalbe had a few things to shout about.


When BikeBiz swung by we were quickly demo'ed a wide variety of new product, form the new trainer specific 'Insider' tyre, to the new 'Green Guard' technology.
Green Guard is something Schwalbe are particularly pleased with as it replaces the old blue puncture protection liner with a one-third recycled puncture protection strip. The new strip-equip Marathon tyre is also suitable for electric bikes.

The Insider tyre, though niche, tackles a long running problem of tyres over-heating on indoor roller trainers. Schwalbe's Tim Ward told BikeBiz of occasions where customers have reported molten rubber splattering out of the back of their rollers due to the heat build up. This is tackled by the Insider, which using a more heat resistant compound suited to training, though would be of little use on the roads thanks to its slick surface. 


Thanks to a long history of professional cross country riders performing bodged tubeless tyre conversions, Schwalbe was also pleased to announce that as of 2011, all higher-priced cross country and all mountain tyres in the line will come tubeless ready. This has been made possible as a result of tweaking the profile of the tyre's bead, thus finding a more secure seating position on the rim. What's more, between zero and five grams will be added to the weight of each tyre, a negligible amount and best of all, price is unaffected by the change. Could this signal the end of UST style production?

Vanmoof (direct)
Vanmoof caught many visitor's attention thanks to a tidy link up with Abus featured on the 'No5' build.
Embedded within the top tube of the patented No5 is an integrated chain lock developed alongside the manufacturer. When on the move the lock tucks into the frame and is said to be silent within while rolling. What's more, as with every other model in the catalogue, the build has an integrated solar-powered LED light in the headtube, as well as tidy finishing components, including a brooks saddle.

UK retailers are already taking interest in the brand, with a handful of stockists in place, though many more are sought. Delivery times form Europe are four to five working days and delivery is free on orders of eight bikes or more.
Vanmoof started out in 2009, winning a Eurobike Award the very same year. Oakwood headtube mounted racks, with a fitting for the replaced solar powered light are available as a tidy add-on accessory.

Tags: eurobike 2010

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