Five grand downhill rigs will have to be fitted with incy-wincy Noddy bells - BikeBiz

Five grand downhill rigs will have to be fitted with incy-wincy Noddy bells

In fact, thanks to those sensible folk at the Department for Transport all new bikes will now have to be fitted with bells. Naturally, they will be poxy bells, easily removed by bike purchasers and there's no requirement for their use, just their fitment at the point of sale. And bikes sold in the UK fully-assembled will have to have their brakes adjusted so the bikes comply with British Standards (dur, IBDs already do this) but bikes-in-boxes from supermarkets and the like need only have instructions on how to assemble them. Oh, and bells, of course.
Author:
Publish date:

Monster dual suspension bikes will no doubt have their bells attached to the bike in little poly bags, ready for quick disposal. Ramblers and newspaper letter writers have long called for cyclists to warn of their presence with the tinkle-tinkle of ye olde traditional bells but the DfT admits that even though some have "wanted a requirement for a bell to be fitted at all times, not just at point of sale...this would be outside the scope of these regulations."

Children's cycles and second hand bikes do not have to be fitted with bells, not even Noddy ones.

The new regulations come into force in on 1st May 2004. The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2003 replaces The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 1984 and The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) (Amendment) Regulations 1984.

The DfT first talked seriously about the enforced fitment of bells (and lights) in 1998. At the time there was talk all cyclists would have to have bells fitted to their bikes but this was soon ruled out as impractical - and unpopular. A further consultation was carried out between June and September 2002. A consultation document was sent to 254 organisations and was published on the Department for Transport’s website.

The DfT wasn't inundated with replies. In fact, only 60 responses were received. There were replies from road safety groups, Trading Standards, the Disabled Persons Advisory Committee, the National Federation of the Blind of the United Kingdom, the Small Business Federation, CTC, BAGB and the ACT, as well as IBDs, some cyclists and (probably) the odd red sock or two.

46 of the responses were in support of the proposed requirement for a bell to be fitted on new cycles. Of these 15 wanted a requirement for a bell to be fitted at all times, not just at point of sale. Eight responses were against the proposal for a bell and six did not comment on this aspect of the proposals.

Will fitting bells to bikes make any difference to safety of pedestrians knocked down by evil cyclists? The DfT thinks it will:

"Although statistics do not record whether a warning bell would help avoid accidents, the balance of probability is that in certain circumstances it would. However, we are unable to put a precise figure on the degree to which cycling accidents would be reduced as a result of the presence and use of a bell."

How good will these bells be? The DfT said "a UK manufacturer has confirmed that the cost...should be approximately 25p."

The DfT estimates the cost to the bike trade will be between £575 000 - £960 000 a year.

"If passed on to the consumer, the total cost, including fitment, is expected to be £2.7m - £9.6m," said the DfT, optimistically.

"However, as the average retail price of a cycle is approximately £150.00 (prices vary from £79.99 to £8 000), it is unlikely that the sales of new pedal cycles would be affected. Cyclists are unlikely to refrain from purchasing a pedal cycle because of a relatively small increase in the price."

Bikes in boxes

From April next year, will supermarkets, and every other low-end retailer of bicycles, have to make sure the bikes they sell, including those sold in boxes, have properly set up brakes? Nope.

And according to the ACT's Anne Killick this is a massive disappointment.

Whilst the DfT said that "evidence from independent cycle retailers indicates that [supermarket] cycles are not always assembled correctly," the DfT did not go down the French route of making sure all bicycles sold have to be ready assembled and PDIed.

Killick was angry:

"The DfT think they've made bikes-in-boxes safer by making manufacturers put bells in the boxes. Supermarkets need do nothing, just stack the boxes up. I'm staggered. The DfT has not taken this opportunity to ensure all bicycles have to be sold ready assembled."

Throwaway line?

And, in a slight to the bike trade, the DfT Regulatory Impact Assessment document on bells and brakes said: "The market is not characterised by rapid technological change." Gee, thanks.

http://www.roads.dft.gov.uk/.../index.htm



CONSUMER PROTECTION


The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2003 Coming into force 1st May 2004 Citation and commencement

1. These Regulations may be cited as the Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2003 and shall come into force on 1st May 2004. Revocation

2. The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 1984[2] and the Pedal Bicycles (Safety) (Amendment) Regulations 1984[3] are hereby revoked. Interpretation

3. - (1) In these Regulations -
"bicycle" means a two-wheeled vehicle that is propelled solely by the muscular energy of the person on that vehicle by means of pedals and has not been constructed or adapted for propulsion by mechanical power; "the British Standard" means - (a) the specification for safety requirements for bicycles issued by the British Standards Institution under reference BS 6102: Part 1: 1992; and (b) the specification for photometric and physical requirements of reflective devices for cycles issued by the British Standards Institution under reference BS 6102: Part 2: 1982 as amended by Amendment No. 1 published on 31st December 1984 under reference AMD 4752; "competition bicycle" means a bicycle which has no brakes and is specifically designed for off-road racing on enclosed tracks; "the ISO Standard" means the technical specifications for bells for bicycles and mopeds published by the International Organisation for Standardisation under reference ISO 7636-1984 (E); "tandem bicycle" means a bicycle which is designed to carry two or more persons at least two of whom can propel the vehicle at the same time; and "tradesman's delivery bicycle" means a bicycle which is designed primarily or entirely for the carriage of goods in the course of a trade.

(2) Save as provided in regulation 4(2), a reference in these Regulations to "supply" includes offering to supply, agreeing to supply, exposing for supply and possessing for supply, and "supplied" and "supplying" shall be construed accordingly. (3) In these Regulations a reference to the height of the saddle of a bicycle is a reference to the height above the ground of the part of the seating area of the saddle which is furthest from the ground when the vehicle to which the saddle is attached is vertical and the saddle is raised to the fullest extent compatible with safety and any pneumatic tyres on the wheels of the vehicle are fully inflated. Supply of new bicycles

4. - (1) Save as provided in paragraph (2) and regulation 6, no person shall supply any bicycle unless - (a) in the case of - (i) a bicycle within the field of application of the British Standard, it complies with all the requirements specified in that standard (including marking requirements) other than that contained in clause 16 (warning devices); or (ii) a bicycle outside the field of application of the British Standard, it complies with standards no less than those specified in the British Standard other than those contained in clause 16 (warning devices) and clause 20(a) (marking);
(b) it has been fitted with a bell which - (i) is of a category intended for use on bicycles; and (ii) complies with the requirements of clause 6.3 of the ISO Standard in relation to bells of that category; and (c) its brakes have been correctly adjusted in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. (2) In relation to paragraph (1)(c) above, "supply" does not include offering to supply, exposing for supply and possessing for supply. Supply of bicycles with unassembled parts

5. Save as provided in regulation 7, no person shall supply a bicycle with unassembled parts unless those parts - (a) are capable of being assembled to form a bicycle which in all respects complies - (i) in a case where the bicycle so formed would be within the field of application of the British Standard, with all the requirements specified in that standard (including marking requirements) other than that contained in clause 16 (warning devices); or (ii) in a case where the bicycle so formed would be outside the field of application of the British Standard, with standards no less than those specified in the British Standard other than those contained in clause 16 (warning devices) and clause 20(a) (marking); (b) include a bell which - (i) is of a category intended for use on bicycles; and (ii) complies with the requirements of clause 6.3 of the ISO Standard in relation to bells of that category;
(c) are supplied with - (i) a list of readily available standard tools; and (ii) the special or non-standard tools,
required to assemble the parts correctly; and (d) are accompanied by a set of instructions containing information on the correct assembly and subsequent adjustment of any parts supplied unassembled. Exemptions to regulation 4

6. - (1) The provisions of regulation 4(1)(a) do not apply in respect of - (a) a tradesman's delivery bicycle; or (b) a tandem bicycle.
(2) The provisions of regulation 4 do not apply in respect of - (a) a bicycle which has previously been supplied and used (other than for the purpose of testing) on or off a road; (b) a bicycle the height of the saddle of which is less than 635 millimetres; (c) a competition bicycle; or (d) a bicycle which has been constructed to the design of an individual person for use by that person in competitive events.
(3) The provisions of regulation 4 do not apply in a case where the person supplying the bicycle reasonably believes that it will not be used in the United Kingdom. Exemptions to regulation 5

7. - (1) The provisions of regulation 5(a) do not apply to the supply of any parts if they are capable of being assembled so as to form a tradesman's delivery bicycle or a tandem bicycle. (2) The provisions of regulation 5 do not apply to the supply of any parts if they - (a) have previously been supplied and used (other than for the purpose of testing) on or off a road as parts of a bicycle; or (b) are capable of being assembled so as to form a bicycle of a kind specified in regulation 6(2)(b) to (d) above.
(3) The provisions of regulation 5 do not apply in a case where the person supplying the parts reasonably believes that they will not be used in the United Kingdom. Equivalent standards

8. - (1) Nothing in these Regulations shall make it unlawful to supply a bicycle or parts if it would not be unlawful to supply the bicycle or parts were there substituted for a reference in these Regulations to the British Standard or the ISO Standard a reference to a corresponding standard. EXPLANATORY NOTE These Regulations, which apply to the whole of the United Kingdom, are made under the Consumer Protection Act 1987 in respect of bicycles which are not constructed or adapted for propulsion by mechanical power. They replace the Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 1984 as amended by the Pedal Bicycles (Safety) (Amendment) Regulations 1984 and are to come into force on 1st May 2004. Subject to exemptions, regulation 4 prohibits a person from -
(a) supplying or agreeing to supply a fully assembled bicycle unless its brakes have been correctly adjusted; (b) supplying, offering or agreeing to supply, or exposing or possessing for supply a fully assembled bicycle unless it is fitted with a bell which complies with the required standard; and (c) supplying, offering or agreeing to supply, or exposing or possessing for supply a fully assembled bicycle unless it complies with the further standards specified in regulation 4(1)(a).
Subject to exemptions, regulation 5 prohibits a person from - (a) supplying, offering or agreeing to supply, or exposing or possessing for supply unassembled parts in kit form for assembly into a bicycle unless they include a bell which complies with the required standard; and (b) supplying, offering or agreeing to supply, or exposing or possessing for supply unassembled parts in kit form for assembly into a bicycle unless those parts are capable of being assembled to form a bicycle which complies with the further requirements specified in regulation 5(a) and are accompanied by certain information as to their correct assembly and subsequent adjustment and any special tools necessary for that purpose.

Featured Jobs

the cycle hub

Workshop Manager

The Cycle Hub I Dubai, United Arab Emirates I Competitive Package & Bonus I Date Published Monday 10th September 2018

Specialized_Logo_Red promo

Rider Care Representative

Specialized UK Ltd I Chessington, Surrey I Salary: Competitive DOE I Date Published Monday 3rd September 2018