Raleigh supports e-cargo trial in partnership with leading highway service provider

Raleigh has teamed up with highway giant Ringway Jacobs to test the potential of e-cargo trikes within business infrastructure.

The trial, which primarily took place in London, supported workforces with transporting materials, tools and equipment between sites, as well as providing individuals with faster and more reliable means of transport from offices to sites.

Congestion can make urban logistics slow and inefficient. London’s average road speeds have been steadily dropping over the last decade, with an average of 9mph in 2019. Combine this with rising running costs for commercial vehicles, as well as parking and congestion zone levies, and it becomes a significant cost issue for many businesses. Raleigh and its partners believe e-cargo bike could offer part of the solution for more sustainable travel.

Mike O’Neill, managing director at Ringway Jacobs, said: “We are continuing to find new ways of working on the UK Highways network that is sustainable and also brings social value to the local communities in which we operate. This includes reducing noise pollution, promoting cleaner air and having less reasons for our fleet to travel on the UK road network to transport materials on site, which could save time and result in increased efficiency. E-Cargo bikes from Raleigh is one of the ways forward for achieving this.”

Lee Kidger, Raleigh UK managing director, added: “We were delighted to support with the trial of our e-cargo bikes, we recognise that cargo bikes have huge potential to support many businesses across multiple industries, to help reduce their carbon footprint and costs whilst increasing efficiency. Raleigh is committed to supporting businesses with sustainability projects to benefit air quality and reduce congestion, making our towns and cities better places to live and work.”

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